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“Berbera Special Economy Zone Will Model Jebel Ali Freezone” DP World

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DP World Press Release

We are pleased to inform you about DP World’s agreement with the Government of the Republic of Somaliland to develop Berbera Special Economic Zone (BSEZ). The project will build on DP World’s existing operations at the Port of Berbera where the port has recently recorded the highest container volumes in its history. Berbera SEZ benefits from excellent connectivity being located less than 15km from Berbera port and is situated along the Berbera-Hargeisa highway.

DP World – which has over 35 years’ experience in developing and managing large-scale special economic zones and ports – will model the project on Jebel Ali Free Zone (Jafza) in Dubai and will position Berbera as a gateway for the region; especially for those companies looking to serve countries in the Horn of Africa and the hinterland.  Investors and tenants in the zone will enjoy the benefit of an attractive regulatory framework and the ease of doing business via a One Stop Shop.

 

Presentation

Please see a short presentation on Berbera SEZ By Clicking Here  

 

Registration of Interest

Work on the project is underway and as we expect demand for the project to be high, we are currently inviting prospective companies to submit their specific requirements for operation in the SEZ.

To register your interest in Berbera SEZ, please fill out the following form: HERE

Once we have received your response, we would be delighted to discuss your requirements in further detail and address any questions you might have about Berbera SEZ. For any immediate follow up queries please contact us on PLEZ@dpworld.com

 

Academic Researches

Somaliland: Sources of Campaign Financing in 2017 Presidential Election

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In a new research carried out by Center for Policy Analysis (CPA), a local Think tank organization publishes a new report on the Sources of Campaign Financing in 2017 Presidential Election in Somaliland. The new report focuses on how the election campaigns were financed by the three political parties and the amount each party spent on those campaigns.

You can download the full report in the below link:

Sources of Campaign Financing in 2017 Presidential Election  

 

 

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Opinion: Where Do I Stand in a Changing Region?

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Over the past six decades, the Horn of Africa has been a region of strife and conflict ravaging both the human lives and state resources. Poor leadership style in the region criminalized both the state and the economy. This is why many fellow citizens in the region believe that the conflicts and crisis in the region are a state-driven.

Somalia’s prolonged state collapse is one of the heartbreaking troubles in the region and greatly impacted on the regional peace and stability. Though it could be debatable, one of the major drivers of the Somalia’s protracted state collapse, is Somalia’s irredentism policy towards the Somali-speaking regions in the Horn. Djibouti, Somali region in Ethiopia, and the Northeastern region in Kenya could be an example. In this case, re-establishing strong state institutions in Somalia by the Somalis, could mean what, to the other states in the region? Do the regional states are honest about restoring well-built state institutions in Somalia? Do Somalis are ready to abandon their irredentism foreign policy objective? These are some thought-provoking questions.

The Republic of Somaliland, which merged with the Italian Somalia in 1960 to form the Greater Somali State in the Horn of Africa declared its withdrawal from the union in 1991, following a bitter war with the Somalia’s military regime. Somaliland has not yet attained de jure recognition from the international community. This is another dilemma in the region which needs a particular attention and consideration of all parties concerned.

The decades-long standoff between Somaliland and Somalia’s warring factions, and even the successive transitional and federal governments, have been shaped by Somalia’s political instability since the collapse of the central government in 1991. This dilemma dates back to the early decades of Somalia’s creation as a state. However, if this stand off were not settled by the concerned parties, it will bring another cycle of conflict and confrontation.

The Ethio–Eritrea border conflict is another dimension of the region’s conflicts. This conflict claimed the lives of over 70,000 people on both sides. Though the two countries are closing up a chapter of hate and hostility, what does this first round negotiation and dialogue mean to the other states in the region? Could it bring political and economic change?.

The Djibouti–Eritrea clash near Ras Doumeira is another potential conflict which may erupt sooner or later, if the two countries fail to address it. Therefore, ending the border conflict between Ethiopia and Eritrea will definitely have an effect on this part of the region. The question is: what kind of effect it will bring?

Claiming Somalia’s territorial waters by Kenya, is a breach of the international boundaries, including territorial waters, and, without hesitation, the Kenyans has shown an interest to extend its territorial sea and jurisdiction to the Somalia waters due to the inward-looking of the Somalia politicians. This is a potential conflict which could erupt sooner or later between Somalia and Kenya.

The four-year old conflict between the Dinka and the Neur, the largest and the second largest ethnic group in South Sudan respectively, is another setback which greatly affected the prospects of the South Sudan’s state in post-independence period. Without doubt, the regional states exported their differences to South Sudan allying with the warring parties.

An oil-rich Abyei region between the two Sudans is another contested area. The two countries are claiming the possession of that part of the region. The Comprehensive Peace Agreement reached by the two sides in 2005 highlighted the importance of resolving the conflict in the contested area of Abyie. This is another potential conflict which can escalate at any time in the future if the two parties fail to resolve it.

Despite the fact that the Horn of Africa is a troubled region, I am not cynical about seeing a peaceful and a prosperous Horn African region, but, the willingness of the regional leaders to realize that ambition is discouraging. I have a grave concern over the future of the region, and returning to war in a struggle to control both the state power and natural resources in the expenses of others is inevitable and unavoidable.

I ask myself, Do the Somali leaders wherever they are aware the changing nature of the Horn? Where do they stand in this changing region? Not as individuals, but as Somali politicians and intellectuals.

 

Nasir M. Ali

Hargeisa, Somaliland

 

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An Open letter to the Ethiopian Prime Minister

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Dear Prime minister,

 

Imagine Agaro or Jimma town bombarded and destroyed by planes belonging to the Ethiopian Army whose whole and sole responsibility was to protect, not to bomb its people. What if MIG17 were to take off from the airport to bomb the town itself? What if you were in your mother’s womb and she could not even walk the distance between Jimma and Sudan-Ethiopia border to look for shelter and safety and to keep you survive inside her womb? Just visualize a situation where your mother could not even think that you would ever survive, because of the   planes’ shelling and soldiers slaughtering their fellow citizens in every corner of the Agaro streets? How would you feel if your mother’s efforts and patience helped you being born in a refugee camp in Sudan and becoming a Sudanese citizen?

From all the above-mentioned questions, I am trying to project how my mother had been able to outlive the long suffering of the shelling and bombing by Somali Army of Hargeisa, where she had been living.  In 1988, my mother was expecting her first child and her ambition was to have her baby born in an environment with adequate medical facilities, but unfortunately, like other mothers in Somaliland then, she was forced to flee to Ethiopia. Luckily enough, she was not among the dead for I would have also died in her womb. In a dark night, without a medical doctor’s help, I joined this world.

Many moons later, and in an absolutely different situation, I was lucky enough to be able to have a country – Ethiopia, its citizenship and other necessary facilities in life. But what about my ancestor’s country- Somaliland? Like the liberation movements in Ethiopia, Somali National Movement took over the power in Somaliland. After years of armed struggle, they managed to withdraw from the failed union with Somalia in 1991.  Since that year, Somaliland has been developing and building its own state with limited external help. Since then, the only friend in the region both politically and economically that my ancestor’s country of Somaliland has had is Ethiopia. It’s been longtime friend of Ethiopia in terms of Security with mutual interest. So, I know firsthand how Somaliland is contributing to the region’s stability, including Ethiopia’s.

Dear Prime Minister, as an Ethiopian citizen having also family members in Somaliland, I am well aware of their desperate need of their right to be recognized as a sovereign independent state. I am thus urged to kindly submit this open letter to you. As a part of your new political strategy in the region and in Africa at large, which I really admire, do please take the lead to recognize the earnest efforts and the tangible contributions being made by the people of Somaliland to the region and to the world. It is in the interest of our both countries. There are a lot of important matters that the two countries share together, and by further elevating our diplomatic status to a higher level of full fledged ambassadorial level, will only do to consolidate the existing friendly relationship and enhance the common interests of the two countries.

Mr. Prime Minister, I am confident that you would give serious consideration to the abovementioned issues and the other vital ones that are not mentioned in this letter, not only because of my being a fellow Ethiopian citizen, but more so because of the dire need which has been emphasized by your declaration at your oath ceremony: “We will stand by our African brothers in general and our neighbors in particular, during good and bad  times.”  Needless to reiterate Somaliland is our neighbor and African brother too.

 

Yasmin M. Kahin,

Law graduate, Poetess and Playwright.

Qalinbila01@gmail.com

 

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